China Totalization Agreements

Agreements to coordinate social protection across national borders have been commonplace in Western Europe for decades. This is followed by a list of the agreements reached by the United States and the effective date of each. Some of these agreements were then revised; The date indicated is the date on which the original agreement came into force. Most U.S. agreements eliminate dual coverage of autonomy by allocating coverage to the worker`s country of residence. For example, under the US-Swedish agreement, an American citizen living in Sweden and living in Sweden is covered only by the Swedish system and is excluded from US coverage. China has also signed totalization agreements with France and Serbia, which will only enter into force once the two states parties have completed the necessary internal legal procedures. Incoming workers in these countries may benefit from certain social security exemptions in China, once the corresponding totalization agreements have been effective. The provisions to eliminate dual coverage for workers are similar in all U.S. agreements. Each of them establishes a basic rule regarding the location of the employment of a workforce. Under this basic “territorial rule,” a worker who would otherwise be covered by both the United States and a foreign regime is subject exclusively to the coverage laws of the country in which he or she works.

The United States has agreements with several nations, the so-called totalization conventions, in order to avoid double taxation of income in relation to social contributions. These agreements must be taken into account in determining whether a foreigner is subject to the U.S. Social Security Tax/Medicare or whether a U.S. citizen or resident alien is subject to the social security taxes of a foreign country. The single-family home rule in U.S. agreements generally applies to workers whose interventions in the host country are expected to last 5 years or less. The 5-year limit for leave for exempt workers is much longer than the limit normally set by agreements in other countries. The agreements allow sSA to add U.S. and foreign coverage credits only if the worker has at least six-quarters of U.S. coverage.

Similarly, a person may need a minimum amount of coverage under the foreign system to have U.S. coverage accounted for in order to meet the conditions for granting foreign benefits. The goal of all U.S. totalization agreements is to eliminate dual social security and taxation, while maintaining coverage for as many workers as possible under the country where they are likely to have the most ties, both at work and after retirement. Any agreement aims to achieve this objective through a series of objective rules. Despite the fact that the agreements aim to allocate social security to the country where the worker is most attached, unusual situations occasionally arise, where strict enforcement of the rules of agreement would result in unusual or unjustified results. For this reason, each agreement contains a provision allowing the authorities of both countries to grant exemptions from the normal rules if both parties agree.